Deviled Veal Tongue

Deviled Veal Tongue

This is farm food.  On farms where they actually still eat food they produce more often then not you eat what is left after selling the rest.  That means what we consider the good cuts usually goes to others.  The wonderful thing about this way of eating is you learn how to use the odds and ends.  If you like corned beef or corned tongue you will really enjoy this recipe.  If you can’t be bothered to corn the tongue then by all means just by a corned beef brisket, cook it and proceed with the recipe below.  It will not be the same as the veal tongue but it will still be really good.

Serves 4

1 onion, peeled, root end left intact and halved

2 carrots, peeled

2 teaspoons pickling spice

2 veal tongues, corned

1 1/2 tablespoon creole mustard

2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

1/2 cup panko bread crumbs

kosher salt and fresh ground pepper

1/4 cup cream

1 egg yolk

2 teaspoons yellow mustard

1 tablespoon capers, chopped

flat leaf parsley, minced, for garnish

2 bunches mustard greens, rinsed and chopped into 1 inch ribbons

1 onion, peeled trimmed and thinly sliced

8 yellow potatoes, peeled

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

For the tongues:

1. Place the onion, carrots, pickling spice and the tongues into a large pot and cover with cold water by 3 inches.

2. Place the pot over medium high heat and bring it to a boil. Once it comes to a boil reduce the heat to a simmer and simmer for 3 hours. Add water if the level gets below the tongues.

3. Remove one of the tongues from the pot and shave a thin slice off the root end and taste it for tenderness. It should be tender. If they are not tender simmer them for another 30 minutes. If so remove the tongues from the pot and place them on a plate. Discard the poaching liquid.

4. Once the tongues have cooled slice off the skin using a filet knife. The tongues can be cooked up to two days in advance wrapped in plastic and stored in the fridge.

5. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Slice the tongues lengthwise in half. Divide the creole mustard equally among the halves and spread it out one each half. Place the halves into a gratin.

6. In a small bowl whisk together the egg yolk, yellow mustard and the cream. Season it with a two finger pinch of salt and a couple of grinds of white pepper. Set aside.

7. Combine the panko bread crumbs with the melted butter and the capers. Season the crumbs with a heavy pinch of salt, remember the capers are salty, and fresh ground pepper.

8. Pour the mustard sauce over the tops of the tongues and then sprinkle the whole gratin with the panko caper crumbs.

9. Bake in the oven for 20 to 30 minutes or until brown. If they tongues came out of the fridge they will take a little longer to get hot. Serve.

For the mustard greens:

1. Place a large pot over medium heat. Add the butter and then the onions. Season the onions with salt and pepper and cook them until they begin to wilt.

2. Add the mustard green and turn the greens until they are coated with oil. Add the potatoes and season the pot with salt and fresh ground pepper.

3. Cover the pot and reduce the heat to a simmer and simmer the greens until they are well wilted and they aren’t so bitter and the potatoes are tender and just cooked though.

4. Taste the greens and adjust the seasoning as necessary. Platter them up and serve.

5 thoughts on “Deviled Veal Tongue

    1. Tom Hirschfeld

      I have never corned deer tongues but I can’t see how it would make a difference what kind of tongue you used with the exception of brining time and since they are much smaller probably cooking times too.

      Like

      1. Suzann

        Thank you for your response. I’ll let you know how it comes out when we get our farm nuisances prepped. ~ Suzann

        Like

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